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Northwood Glass

Northwood Glass

The Northwood Glass Company was founded by English-born Harry Northwood, son of a talented glass manufacturer.

Harry left England to work in America in 1880, when he was twenty years old, and founded his own factory in 1887 in Ohio, before eventually moving to Wheeling, West Virginia. Many people believe that it was Harry who brought the technique of iridizations to the USA, having seen it at his father’s glassworks. Continue reading Northwood Glass

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Heisey Glass

Heisey_Glass_Logo

Augustus H. Heisey was an original board member of the U.S. Glass Co and commercial sales manager until he left in 1893 to pursue other interests. After a couple of years in Colorado, Heisey decided to return to glassmaking and decided to build a factory in Newark, Ohio. Construction began in 1895 with the first glass made in April of 1896. Continue reading Heisey Glass

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Flashed Glassware

Flash_Glass_Vase

The popularity of Joseph Locke’s Amberina prompted the production of what is known as “flashed wares” to the trade. An article of glass was formed and the inner surface of the object was partially coated with a thin plating of glass of another, more dominant, color – usually a ruby red. The result was a parti-colored, shaded glassware. Continue reading Flashed Glassware

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Crown Milano and Albertine

Crown_Milano_Ewer

Painting and enameling was by no means a novel means of decorating opal glassware in the nineteenth century, but by giving it an exotic name lke “Crown Milano” the Mt. Washington Glass Company was able to arouse enough interest in enameled opal glassware to warrant its production on a large and profitable scale. Continue reading Crown Milano and Albertine