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Pickle Castors

The Victorian dining table was a sight to behold. The upper and middle classes of that era practiced elaborate eating customs that required a utensil for every function and a container for every food. The table would be replete with such pieces as napkin rings, celery dishes, individual salts, lidded mustards, castor sets for oil, vinegar and other condiments, tilting water pitchers, braziers, cinnamon shakers and, for a brief period, pickle castors. Continue reading Pickle Castors

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Pearl Satinglass – Pearl Satin Ware

Pearl Satin GlassFor many years Pearl Satin Ware, sometimes called Pearl Ware, or Mother-of-Pearl Satinglass, has proved to be one of the most popular collectibles offered to a glass-conscious public. The various patterns in which this ware can be found, plus the many shades and combinations of color which may be encountered, make it to many collectors the most interesting of all the glasses fabricated in the nineteenth century.

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Peach Blow Glass

Peach Blow Glass

The publicity attendant on the sale of a Peach Blow porcelain vase for eighteen thousand dollars on March 8, 1886, precipitated the manufacture of glass and pottery reproduction of this ware. The vase, one of the thousands of art objects sold by the American Art Institute for the estate of Mrs. Mary Morgan, was reported to have once been in the collection of a Chinese mandarin named Wang Ye. Continue reading Peach Blow Glass

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Northwood Glass

Northwood Glass

The Northwood Glass Company was founded by English-born Harry Northwood, son of a talented glass manufacturer.

Harry left England to work in America in 1880, when he was twenty years old, and founded his own factory in 1887 in Ohio, before eventually moving to Wheeling, West Virginia. Many people believe that it was Harry who brought the technique of iridizations to the USA, having seen it at his father’s glassworks. Continue reading Northwood Glass